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Upcoming PCPG events

    • February 16, 2022
    • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
    • Webinar
    • 162
    Register

    Dust Suppression with Appalachian Basin Oil and Gas Produced Water: Efficacy and Water Quality

    Presenter

    Nathaniel Warner, PhD, Assistant Professor

    Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

    The Pennsylvania State University


    Please read:  After registering on our site you'll receive a PCPG confirmation email indicating Action Required in the subject line. Your registration is not complete until you click through the unique link in that email directing you to the GoToWebinar web site, enter your name, email address, consent to terms and conditions, and click the Register button.  Check your spam filter if you do not see the PCPG 'Action Required' email within 60 seconds of registering, here.

    PCPG will circulate a PDH certificate documenting registrant’s participation time, not to exceed 60 minutes, within 72 hours of the conclusion of the webinar.

    Level: Basic/General

    Who should attend:  Anyone in the community interested in the potential beneficial use of oil and gas produced water for dust suppression or deicing.

    Webinar Overview:  Oil and gas produced waters (OGPW) are spread on roads for dust suppression and/or deicing in Pennslvania and  at least 11 other states in the United States. Typically, these OGPWs are saltier than seawater and reffered to as brines, whose chemical compositions are somewhat similar to commercial inorganic products commonly used for dust suppression (e.g., calcium chloride or magnesium chloride). However, OGPW is not a pure solution of calcium chloride (CaCl2) or magnesium chloride (MgCl2) or sodium chloride (NaCl). Instead, OGPW from formations in the Appalachian Basin, including western Pennsylvania, are typically classified as Na-Ca-Cl waters containing a blend of alkali metals (Na, K, Li) and alkaline earth metals (Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba) charge-balanced primarily by chloride. The ratio between alkali metals to alkaline earth metals in brines and OGPW is expected to be one of the key factors with respect to dust suppressant efficacy (Graber et al., 2019). OGPWs also contain a variety of contaminants of concern raising questions about the practice of spreading them on roads,

    Here we present the results of two studies on the use of OGPW on dirt and gravel roads in Pennsylvania. First we explore the efficacy of OGPW from Pennsylvania wells to suppress dust, including the major controls on efficacy the total dissolved solids content and the sodium adsorption ratio. Second we measure water quality parameters in raingfall runoff experiments on a simulated dirt and gravel road that was treated with various dust suppressants, including OGPW. Parameters measured include total dissolved solids, total suspendedsolids, major and trace metals, as well as radium activity.

    About our Presenter: Nathaniel Warner is an Assistant Professor at The Pennsylvania State University in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department. His research focuses on using isotope geochemistry to better understand the processes controlling sources of salts in produced waters, shallow groundwater, and surface water. His work has recently examined the accumulation of metals associated with oil and gas development in sediment, dust and Civil and Environmental Engineering. He received his BA in Geoscience from Hamilton College in NY, MS from Miami University in OH, and PhD from Duke University in NC.

    • March 29, 2022
    • 8:00 AM - 4:30 PM
    • Chester County Public Safety Training Campus, 137 Modena Rd., Coatesville, PA
    • 19
    Register

    Hydrostructural Methods in Bedrock Aquifer Characterization and Remedial Decision Making

    Instructor

    Thomas D. Gillespie P.G., Sr. Professional Geologist
    Gilmore & Associates, Inc.


    Agenda and Instructor Bio

    Read what others have said about this seminar.

    Chester County Public Safety Training Campus

    137 Modena Rd.

    Coatesville, PA


    Facility Directions

    PCPG seminars quickly sell out. To confirm your seat, use our secure web enrollment and a credit card.

    Professional Development Conversion Formulas
    DE, SC 60 mins. = 1 CEU
    PA 50 mins. = 1 PDH 

    8:00:  Registration Opens
    8:30 - 4:30:  Seminar, with morning refreshments and lunch provided.

    Please bring the following to the seminar: pencil, eraser, calculator, scale, protractor, and scratch paper.

    Level:  Advanced

    As in all groundwater systems, gravity-driven flow through bedrock formations occurs within a single integrated hydrologic potential field in which every particle of groundwater residing in connected pore spaces below the phreatic surface is affected by, and contributes to, the overall field potential. Flow in most bedrock aquifers occurs through a three-dimensional network of saturated, hydraulically connected planar discontinuities which typically occur in multiple, pervasive, non-randomly oriented sets, each set being possessed of a unique, statistically averaged, orientation. Therefore, bedrock formations generally contain discontinuities at several predominant strike directions, typically none of which are parallel to the groundwater flow vector. Consequently, groundwater flow along a field hydraulic gradient is sub-parallel to the strikes of all planes, providing for three-dimensional flow as dictated by the flow field.

    Combining a refresher on the concepts and methods of structural geology with quantitative analysis of gravity-driven groundwater flow within and between discrete, connected, planar flow pathways, this full day, hands-on course provides the tools of both visualization and quantification of flow in three-dimensional space. Including a complete review of the methods of planar structural analysis, the course explores: the control of geologic structure on groundwater flow within individual fractures; anisotropic responses to aquifer testing and a comparison to field anisotropy; structurally-controlled deflection of tracers and/or contaminant plumes; the effects of the scale of observation on aquifer heterogeneity and anisotropy; migration of separate phase liquids and gases; the hydrologic effects of fault systems; groundwater flow within structural domains of differing, yet overlapping, scales of observation.   

    • April 13, 2022
    • 8:30 AM - 6:00 PM
    • Best Western Central Hotel & Conference Center 800 East Park Drive Harrisburg, PA
    • 100

    Save the date

    PCPG Annual Meeting

    The Best Western Central Hotel & Conference Center

    800 East Park Drive
    Harrisburg, PA  17111

    Overview 

    Ballroom A/B/C

    8:30 - 9:00 Annual Meeting Registration

    9:00 - 4:30 Annual Meeting 

    4:30 - 6:00 Announcements/Adjournment/Door Prizes/Networking Reception

     

    Heritage Room

     Student Poster Session



    • April 19, 2022
    • 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    • 3240 Schoolhouse Road, Middletown, PA
    • 9
    Register
    Essentials of Borehole Geophysics & Field Demonstration


    Instructor

    Scott Wendling, P.G., Vice President

    ARM Geophysics

    PCPG seminars quickly sell out. To confirm your seat, use our secure web enrollment and a credit card.

    8:30:  Registration Opens
    9:00 - 4:00:  Seminar, with morning refreshments and lunch provided.

    LEVEL: Intermediate to advanced.

    Professional Development Conversion Formulas
    DE, SC 60 mins. = 1 CEU
    PA 50 mins. = 1 PDH 

    This seminar and field demonstration is designed for geologists, engineers, and environmental specialists who want to maximize information from exploratory wells for site characterization by using borehole geophysical logging and imaging tools.  It will focus primarily on environmental, geotechnical, ground water, and oil & gas applications.

    The class objective is to provide attendees with a working understanding of the available borehole geophysical methods for utilization on their projects.  Each borehole method has advantages and disadvantages that must be understood in order to apply the most appropriate method(s) to the project objectives and site conditions.  After a discussion on logging & imaging tools/methods, the seminar will focus on the interpretation of geophysical and imaging logs.  Examples and case studies will be discussed to provide attendees with an understanding of how logs and images are used to determine lithology, correlate stratigraphy, characterize structure, and identify water producing and receiving zones.  A field demonstration will be presented to provide attendees with a hands-on field data acquisition experience.

    WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Professional Geologists, Project Managers, Geologists in Training, Environmental Scientists, Environmental Engineers, and related professionals with an interest in advancing their ability to characterize the hydrogeological, structural, and geotechnical aspects of the subsurface.

    INSTRUCTOR BIO:  Scott Wendling, P.G. is a senior geologist and geophysicist for ARM Geophysics in Hershey, Pennsylvania. He currently serves as Vice President and is responsible for all geophysical services provided by ARM. He has more than 33 years of experience managing and performing surface and borehole geophysical surveys for environmental, engineering, and exploration projects. Mr. Wendling received his Bachelor of Science and Master of Science Degrees in Geology from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. Mr. Wendling’s Master’s Degree focused on geophysics and his Master’s Thesis was part of a consortium jointly sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Geological Survey of Canada, and included several U.S. and Canadian Universities. Mr. Wendling has provided geophysical training presentations to a wide range of organizations, including PCPG, PA Geological Survey, PADEP, WVDEP, USGS, PAPUC, Marcellus Shale Coalition, AEG, PAEP, and several private companies/organizations. He has been a licensed Professional Geologist in Pennsylvania since 1994.

    • April 26, 2022
    • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
    • Webinar
    • 160
    Register

    Factors affecting groundwater quality used for domestic supply in Marcellus Shale region of north-central and north-east Pennsylvania

    Level: Intermediate to Advanced

    Presenter

    Charles “Chuck” Cravotta, PhD, P.G.

    Research Hydrologist/Geochemist

    U.S. Geological Survey, Pennsylvania Water Science Center

    Please read:  After registering on our site you'll receive a PCPG confirmation email indicating Action Required in the subject line. Your registration is not complete until you click through the unique link in that email directing you to the GoToWebinar web site, enter your name, email address, consent to terms and conditions, and click the Register button.  Check your spam filter if you do not see the PCPG 'Action Required' email within 60 seconds of registering, here; ask IT to release the Email; if you use Gmail, our system workflow emails are received into some other Gmail folder.  Please white-list all @pcpg.org emails.

    PCPG will circulate a PDH certificate documenting registrant’s participation time, not to exceed 60 minutes, within 72 hours of the conclusion of the webinar.

    Level: Intermediate to Advanced

    Who should attend: Engineers, hydrologists, geologists, regulatory authorities

    Webinar Overview:  Factors affecting groundwater quality used for domestic supply within the Marcellus Shale footprint in north-central and north-east Pennsylvania are identified using a combination of spatial, statistical, and geochemical modeling. Untreated groundwater, sampled during 2011-2017 from 472 domestic wells within the study area, exhibited wide ranges in pH (4.5 to 9.3), total dissolved solids (TDS, 22 to 1960 mg/L), sodium (0.3 to 760 mg/L), chloride (0.3 to 1020 mg/L), bromide (<0.01 to 8.6 mg/L), and methane (<0.001 to 77 mg/L). The wells had depths ranging from 10 to 394 m; 69.5 percent were completed in sandstone bedrock, 19.3 percent in shale, 4.2 percent in siltstone, 4 percent in carbonate, and 3 percent in unconsolidated alluvial or glacial deposits. Groundwater quality in the Delaware River watershed, in the eastern part of the study area where Marcellus gas has not been developed, was similar to that in the Susquehanna, Allegheny, and Genesee River watersheds in the western part of the study area where natural gas production from Marcellus Shale has been ongoing since 2008. Most groundwaters were calcium/bicarbonate type with near-neutral pH; approximately 10 percent were sodium/bicarbonate and 1 percent were sodium/chloride types. Sodium-enriched waters, which were mostly from shale and siltstone aquifers, had the greatest frequency of elevated pH (>8.5) and elevated concentrations of TDS (>250 mg/L), bromide (>0.15 mg/L), methane (>7.0 mg/L), and lithium (>60 mg/L). Geochemical models indicate these characteristics could result from progressive mineral dissolution combined with cation exchange, plus mixing with locally important salinity sources, including as much as 0.7 percent Appalachian Basin brine and/or road-deicing salt. Multivariate correlation models suggest the observed variability in methane concentrations may be attributed to several environmental factors, such as geochemical evolution along groundwater flow paths, redox conditions, and/or mixing with saline groundwater or brine. Most samples having elevated methane were from shale aquifers, which were mainly in the Susquehanna River basin and had the greatest density of gas wells compared to other lithologies. Samples having elevated methane were also observed in the Delaware River watershed and other areas outside gas development. Isotopic compositions of methane for a subset of 39 samples (selected because of elevated methane) and relatively high ratios of methane to ethane in those samples indicated methane could be derived from microbial gas mixed with thermogenic gas that may have undergone degradation and/or fractionation during migration. The methods used in this study could be broadly applicable to understanding major factors affecting groundwater quality, particularly for explaining variations in ionic composition with pH and identifying sources of salinity and associated constituents (e.g. sodium, chloride, bromide, lithium, methane) that may have geogenic or anthropogenic origins.

    About our Presenter:  Charles “Chuck” Cravotta is a research hydrologist at USGS, Pennsylvania Water Science Center. He is a registered professional geologist (PG-002255-G), with a B.A. in Environmental Sciences from University of Virginia and M.S. and Ph.D. in Geochemistry and Mineralogy from Penn State University. His research emphasizes geochemical and hydrological processes that control water quality, particularly the sources, transport, and attenuation of metals and nutrients in watersheds and aquifers affected by mining. Results, reported in more than 100 peer-reviewed publications, apply to scientific and regulatory programs for the prevention and remediation of contaminants in water supplies.

    • September 30, 2023
    • See order form
    Register
    To order a replacement certificate for a previously attended PCPG event, please complete the order form and remit payment.

    Replacement will occur only if attendee initialed the sign-in/sign-out sheet.

    During busy periods, certificate replacement may take 7-10 days.

    Questions? Contact Rose Jeffries by phoning (717) 730-9745.





 

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